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The Hobbit trilogy

The Hobbit trilogy

As a great fan of fantasy, I have read all the books of J.R.R. Tolkien with a genuine interest. I was looking forward to seeing the screen version. The Lord of the Rings trilogy by Peter Jackson left me speechless. When I learnt that The Hobbit movie was to be released, I bought the tickets for the premiere. Actually I was surprised that the director (Peter Jackson again) decided to divide the book into three parts. The novel is concise, humorous, and it is more like a fairy tale for children with not a very complicated plot. The story is artificially dragged out, some new stuff was invented and as a result we got a thinly plotted and dull film.

The screenplay was written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson, and Guillermo del Toro. The cast includes Martin Freeman as Bilbo, Ian McKellen as Gandalf, Orlando Bloom as Legolas and many more. Principal photography took place in New Zealand and began in March 2011 and ended in July 2012. Additional filming for the second and third installments began in May 2013 and lasted for 10 weeks. The films were filmed in 3D using Red Epic cameras.

After a great success of The Lord of the Rings we expected a lot from The Hobbit. It is one thing not to live up to expectations. But The Hobbit, unfortunately, actually made earlier works of Peter Jackson look worse.

The Lord of the Rings – trilogy

The Lord of the Rings – trilogy

Directed by Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings is a film series consisting of three high fantasy adventure films – The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2002). All the three parts are based on the trilogy The Lord of the Ring by J. R. R. Tolkien.

It tells as the story about the most powerful ring, capable of ruling all the other rings given to the most important races and the struggle to break its master’s dark power. Having read the books, we know that the plot is far from simple and that it is a real challenge to make such a detailed book, which actually creates its own world, with geography, history and languages, into a feature film and faithfully stick to every detail. However, Jackson did his best. The film sticks as closely to the books as possible.

The casting could not have been better. Elijah Wood is perfect as Frodo, Orlando Bloom breaks women’s hearts as Legolas, while Liv Tyler (Arwen) does the same with the other sex.

The films’ overall budget exceeded $300 million, the entire project took eight years and all the three installments were shot simultaneously in New Zealand.

The series was a great financial success being among the highest-grossing film series of all time. The films were acclaimed by critics and won 17 out of 30 total Academy Award nominations.

Avatar

Avatar

Who has not seen “Avatar”? It was one of the first 3D feature films that could be seen in the cinemas all over the world. Directed by James Cameron, who is well-known for directing such blockbusters as The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989) and Titanic (1997), the film, despite its length (163 minutes) does not feel too long. Too much is going on there. The story itself is quite complicated: it takes place in the year 2154 and involves a mission by U.S. Armed Forces to a planet called Pandora, which is a rich source of a mineral Earth needs. Pandora is inhabited by the Na’vi, a blue-skinned race of giants. As the atmosphere is not breathable by humans, they have to use avatars – figures looking like Na’vi, grown organically and mind-controlled by humans. The arrival of humans destroys the idyllic life of the indigenous population of Na’vi.

The film not only has a clear anti-war and pro-ecological massage, but also is a technical breakthrough. It contains a number of innovative visual effects techniques like a new system for lighting massive areas or an improved method of capturing facial expressions using skull caps and tiny cameras in front of the actors’ faces.

“Avatar” is a crucial film for cinematography. It is not only worth-seeing, it is actually a sin not to have seen it. It is one of those films you must know to keep up with the conversation.

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